Airport Ground Support
Equipment Resources

High Lift Trucks Slip Trips and Falls

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Purpose: To prevent potential injuries due to slips, trips and falls while employees utilize high lift trucks

Mounting and Dismounting

Potential Hazards:

  • Slippery surfaces (worn anti-skid materials on steps and ladders)
  • Ground surface conditions
  • Twisting body improperly
  • Poor lighting
  • Broken steps/ladder or handrail
  • Improper truck box height

Possible Solutions:

  • Wear shoes with sturdy, slip resistant soles to increase traction
  • Be aware of surrounding area for puddles, glycol, ice and other slippery substances
  • Be sure your hands are free of items and maintain three points of contact (two hands and a foot or two feet and a hand) (Figure 1-3)
  • Keep your body in alignment when mounting or dismounting (Figure 1-3)
  • Conduct walk-around and report damages or inoperable parts
    • Ensure truck lights are in proper working order
    • Ensure steps/ladder and handrail are in a good condition
  • Ensure truck box is in its lowest position before mounting and dismounting
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    2

Loading and Unloading Potential Hazards:

  • Tripping over supplies/equipment (Figure 4)
  • Slippery surface and/or weather conditions
  • Uneven surfaces (Figure 5)
  • Poor lighting
  • Broken or missing fall restraint barrier
  • Broken or missing handrails
  • Improper positioning of handrails
  • Gap between aircraft and work platform

Possible Solutions:

  • Wear shoes with sturdy, slip resistant soles to increase traction
  • Clear the surrounding area of any slippery substances and debris
  • Use approved de-icing product
  • Follow company policies for operations during high winds
  • Keep walkways and passages clear (Figure 6)
  • Proceed cautiously on uneven surfaces
  • Ensure truck lights are in proper working order
  • Ensure fall restraint barrier and handrails are in place and in good condition
  • Ensure handrails are properly positioned (Figure 7)
  • Align truck perpendicular to the aircraft door and position to minimize the gap
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    4

Walking Around the Vehicle Potential Hazards:

Possible Hazards:

 

  • Slippery surface and/or weather conditions
  • Ramp congestion (equipment, baggage or debris)
  • Uneven surfaces
  • Poor lighting

Possible Solutions:

  • Wear shoes with sturdy, slip resistant soles to increase traction
  • Be aware of slippery substances such as puddles, glycol, and ice
  • Stay clear of vehicle stabilizers, chocks, and other equipment staged in the area
  • Be aware of surrounding area and remove any debris
  • Be aware of uneven ramp surfaces such as pot holes, fuel pit covers, and storm drains
  • Ensure truck lights are in proper working order
  • Use caution when working in low light conditions
    5

Additional Resources

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

  • 14 CFR 139, Certification and Operations: Land Airports Servicing Certain Air Carriers. This is part of the electronic code of federal regulations. Specific areas of interest for the airline industry may include:
    • 139.101, Certification requirements: General
    • 139.203, Contents of airport certification manual
    • 139.205, Amendment of contents of airport certification manual
    • 139.329, Ground vehicles

Part 139 Certification. Requires the FAA to issue airport operating certificates to airports that serve scheduled and unscheduled air carrier aircraft with more than 30 seats or that the FAA Administrator requires to have a certificate.

Through the OSHA and Airline Group Safety Panel Alliance, the Airline Ground Safety Panel developed this Fact Sheet for informational purposes only. It does not necessarily reflect the official views of OSHA or the U.S. Department of Labor. 01/2013